Many of us don’t think too much when it comes to a viral infection often believing plenty of rest, and fluids is the best way to help get rid of it.

 

And while this is the case for most, on rare occasions, they can be potentially lethal and it is important to know what you are dealing with.

 

What is a viral infection?

A viral infection can be caused my many different viruses and can affect your baby’s respiratory system or their intestine. The most common viral infection is the common cold or flu.

 

How does it spread?

A viral infection spreads when a person with the disease coughs or sneezes. It can also be transferred via hand to mouth – an infected person touches your baby. 

 

Symptoms of a viral infection

Symptoms of the infection depends on the actual illness itself. They can affect the respiratory tract manifesting itself as the common cold or even the intestine as a stomach bug. And while your baby will experience symptoms depending on their illness they will likely suffer from the following: fatigue, vomiting, diarrhoea, cold sores, coughing, sneezing, runny nose or red throat.

 

What symptoms should you be vigilant of?

There are a number of symptoms that you should be aware of: fatigue, fever, persistent coughing, sore stomach, blood in their nappy, refusing to drink, diarrhoea for over two weeks or difficulty breathing. Be aware that babies and children under the age of two are vulnerable to complications such as pneumonia so always go to the doctor if you have any concerns.

 

When should you take your little one to a doctor?

Most viral infections aren’t anything to be worried about but your little one is suffering from any of the following you will need to take them to the doctor straight away: they have a very high fever, a rash, a persistent cough, or have become dehydrated.

 

How to treat your baby

One of the most effective ways to help your baby over their infection is to ensure they get lots of rest and plenty of fluids. Make sure you and other family members wash your hands regularly to stop it spreading from person to person.

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