Your baby’s first year is a whirlpool of first smiles, first tooth, first roll over and first steps, however, it’s not all about good things. There are a few health issues that can crop up during this time as well and while most are mild, others can be less so and need to be checked by a doctor. 
 
Here are the most common issues and how to help them.
 
Nappy rash
Nappy rash is fairly common in your baby’s first year. It is easy to spot the signs as the skin that touches the nappy can become red and inflamed. It is mainly caused by moisture sitting on the skin or if they have been in a dirty nappy for too long. It is easily treated by changing their nappy frequently and using a mild baby soap. Allow your baby’s bum be air-dried by giving them plenty of nappy-free time. When you are changing them, leave the nappy off for awhile before putting a clean one on.
 
Reflux
Reflux is common in infants for the first half of their first year. Until they are six months old, the valve that connects to their stomach works both ways, causing their food to come back up. This is usually in the form of a white liquid and is commonly referred to as wind or poss. It can be uncomfortable for your infant so put them over your shoulder and gently rub or tap them on the back to help it come up.
 
Ear infection
An ear infection is common in the first year, and your little one is likely to suffer from at least one before their first birthday. If your infant has one they will be irritable, pull at their ear, they might also have fluid coming out of it, or have a lack of interest in food. If you do suspect your little one has an ear ache, make sure you take them to the doctor who might be able to prescribe something to ease their discomfort and clear it up. 
 
Fever
When your baby has a fever, it can be a terrifying experience for a mum. A fever is usually associated with an infection such as a viral one, but it can also occur after they have been given a routine vaccination. Your baby’s temperature is normal when it is between 36°C and 37°C - if it exceeds 37.5°C, it is a fever. Babies under three months with a temperature of 38°C need to be taken to the doctor and those aged between three and six months need to be checked by your GP if their temperature is 39°C.

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