Is it teething time for your little one?

 

There is a lot of discussion right now about educating our children on the topics of health and the importance of a balanced diet and regular exercise, and the following research has proven just why this is so vital.

 

According to findings published in scientific journal The Lancet, almost one-fifth of the world’s obese adults live in the Republic of Ireland.

 

The UK, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand are also highly ranked for obesity rates in the study.

 

The study, carried out by experts in the UK, uncovered some alarming statistics for both the present state and the future of the country.

 

 

Firstly, Irish men have been found to have highest BMI (Body Mass Index) in Europe. Secondly – and equally as alarming – the research team have predicted that, by 2025, a staggering 37% of Irish women will be obese.

 

So, now that these concerning statistics are out there, the question is: how do we turn things around for the safety and health of ourselves and our children?

 

Professor Majid Ezzati, one of the study authors, suggested: “To avoid an epidemic of severe obesity, new policies that can slow down and stop the worldwide increase in body weight must be implemented quickly and rigorously evaluated, including smart food policies and improved healthcare training.”

 

Has this latest research concerned you? What do you think we can do in our daily lives to turn things around?

 

SHARE and let us know.

15 Shares

Latest

Trending

Hello Mama!
Help us help you by allowing us and our partners to remember your device as having browsed MummyPages and serve you better content and ads

We're on a mission to help our mums and their families thrive by informing, connecting and entertaining.

Join us in our mission by consenting to the use of cookies and IP address recognition by us and our partners to serve you content (including ads) best suited to your interests, both here and around the web.

We promise never to share any other information that may be deemed personal unless you explicitly tell us it's ok.

If you want more info, see our privacy policy.