Every mum likes to have plenty of family photos, yet it can sometimes be a challenge getting a nice photo of your kids. Here are a few tips to get great pictures. You don’t need to hire a professional or invest in a high-tech camera, just follow these guidelines to have some lovely photos that you will treasure for years to come.
  • Focus on the eyes
Focusing on your child’s eyes is a great way of bringing a photo to life. The photos feel more personal and you can see your subject more clearly. Also, by using the eyes are your focus point, your child’s face will be more in focus. You may be thinking “it’s hard enough to get my child to sit still, never mind to actually look at me!” but don’t worry. Your child doesn’t have to be looking directly at you to get a great shot. Some of the nicest photos are when your child is captivated by something else. Just use the eyes as a focus point and you will get a lovely clear shot of their face.
  • Stoop to their level
Adults are taller than children (believe it or not) and we are used to looking at our children from above. So a photo of our child can be particularly engaging when it’s taken from a different perspective. Bend down and take the photo at their level. It will make a big difference.
  • Get in their face
A close up of a child’s face can make for the loveliest photo so use your zoom lens and make their face fill your entire view finder. Don’t worry about cutting off their chin or the top of their head – it will look great regardless.
  • Be aware of the background
When your gorgeous little one is in front of the camera, it can be easy to forget what else is in the frame. If you’re not careful you might have a background that takes away from your child. We’ve all had photos where it looks like a branch is growing out of our head! You don’t have to place your child in a field of flowers or anything spectacular, but just be aware of what else is in the frame so your child will look their best.
  • Try some new angles
Try out different angles and see what kind of results you get. It doesn’t have to be excessively arty – try taking shots from below or tipping your camera a little forward. Or you could lie on the ground or even place your camera on the pillow next to your baby’s sleeping head. Have fun and be creative!
  • Take advantage of your camera settings
If your child won’t stop moving around, see if your camera has a Sports Mode or Child Mode and try them out rather than Auto. These modes are specifically designed to capture moving subjects. It may be an easier option than actually trying to get your child to stay still.
  • Read your camera manual
Cameras nowadays come with great features so flick through the manual and see what your camera has to offer. Take advantage of these features and you might get some really creative and beautiful shots. Once you really know how to use your camera you could find a dramatic improvement in your photos.
  • Shoot, shoot, shoot.
Take as many photos as possible. You are far more likely to get a few good images the more you take. With digital cameras now you can easily discard the others.
  • Don’t forget about you!
In most family photos you will find there is often one parent who is always behind the camera and never ends up in any of the photos. Make sure to give the camera to other people or use a timer if your camera has one. In years to come both you and your child will be glad you’re in the pictures.

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