The teenage years are tough not just on you but on your son or daughter as well, which is why they need their friends around them many of who you will like. However, when they start to hang out peers who get them into trouble or encourage bad behaviour, it’s time to intervene.

 

Tell them you are worried

Tell your son or daughter that you are concerned about their behaviour whether it is smoking or drinking and explain why. However, make sure you listen to what they have to say without judgement to avoid any arguments.

 

Set rules

Your teenager needs rules so they are aware of boundaries and what you deem unacceptable behaviour. When establishing these rules make sure you set out consequences so they are aware of what will happen if they stray again.

 

Encourage them to hang out with others

Before they got in with the wrong crowd they must of had friends that you not only trusted and liked but who were good for your teen. Ask about these people and see if your adolescent still has any communication with them.

 

Don’t forbid them

No matter how much you are worried about the people they are hanging around with, forbidding your son or daughter from seeing them will just make them want to be with to hang out with them even more. Tell them that you would like them to stop, but never say “I forbid/ban you”.

 

Don’t be overly judgemental

Don’t be overly judgemental about their friends - just like forbidding them from seeing these people, you will only push your teen towards them even more.

 

Seek professional help

If all else fails and you are still concerned, seek help from a professional before your teen ventures too far off the track. Talk to your GP. 

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