Is it teething time for your little one?

This week we have reported on two concerning stories where the women involved had to fight for crucial health examinations, and the dangers of this are clear in this latest report.

 

It was a tragedy by all accounts when baby Emma Folwell passed away at Sunshine Hospital in Cairnlea, Australia, but what makes it even more heartbreaking is that her life could have been saved, had doctors addressed her mother’s concerns.

 

Linda Folwell grew worried when, late into her eighth pregnancy, she noticed that her baby had become less active. However, when she reported her concerns to her doctor, she was told not to worry because the baby was “gentle and petite”.

 

Ms Folwell was admitted full-term to Sunshine Hospital in July 2011 after contacting her midwife to tell her that she was in pain and not “feeling right”. After undergoing tests, it was discovered that her baby was struggling, and she was born two-and-a-half hours later in “poor condition”.

 

Baby Emma was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit at The Royal Women’s Hospital, where she tragically passed away three days later. An autopsy ruled that the cause of death was a hypoxic brain injury following chronic placental failure.

 

 

An examination by the coroner is now examining the family’s claims that their baby could have been saved had doctors taken Ms Folwell’s concerns seriously.

 

Lawyers for the family also claim that Emma should have been delivered immediately by caesarean section when tests showed she was in trouble.

 

Speaking at the inquiry into the tragic death, Fiona Ellis of Western Health said: “It is clear that the tension between the clinicians, real or perceived, impacted on the delivery of care to Ms Folwell.”

 

We will be following the case for updates.

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