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The benefits of breastfeeding have been widely publicised time and time again, and now researchers are highlighting the link between nursing and protection against breast cancer.

 

In a new study released this week, researchers are claiming that women who breastfeed their babies are significantly less at risk of the disease recurring or killing them.

 

As part of their study, researchers in the US looked at data belonging to 1,636 women battling breast cancer.

 

According to their findings, a history of breastfeeding reduced the subjects’ chances of cancer returning after treatment by 30%, while the risk of dying was lowered by 28%.

 

The study revealed that breastfeeding had a protective effect, particularly when it came to the type of tumour.

 

 

Lead researcher Dr Marilyn Kwan commented on the significance of the research, saying: “This is the first study we’re aware of that examined the role of breastfeeding history in cancer recurrence, and by tumour subtype.”

 

“Women who breastfeed are more likely to get the luminal A subtype of breast cancer, which is less aggressive, and breastfeeding may set up a molecular environment that makes the tumour more responsive to anti-oestrogen therapy,” she added.

 

They found that the protection was strongest among women who had a history of breastfeeding for six months or longer. 

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