It is well known that a mum's touch is said to be crucial in helping her to bond with her baby, but a new study has revealed that babies may even be able to recognise these touches while still in the womb.

 

Babies in the uterus have been recorded reaching out to touch the wall of the womb, responding to their mother rubbing her bump during pregnancy.

 

Using three-dimensional ultrasound videos, the scientists behind the study were able to watch how unborn babies reacted to people touching their mum's bump. 

 

The amazing study revealed that the unborn babies responded the strongest when a mum rubbed her own bump, in comparison to when a stranger or the baby's dad did.

 

Pregnant Woman Wearing Marled Gray Sweater Touching Her Stomach

 

These findings would suggest that the baby recognised who was involved in the bump rubbing, and it may also explain why women feel their babies moving when they touch their bump. 

 

Dr Viola Marx, a psychologist at the University of Dundee, was the lead author of the study, which has been published in the Journal Infant Behaviour And Development.

 

"Mothers spontaneously and also intentionally touch their abdomen during pregnancy, often to communicate with the foetus. Any stimulation can be beneficial to the development of the foetus and bonding of the mother, father and the foetus," she explained. 

 

Free stock photo of woman, motherboard, mother, pregnancy

 

In a strange turn of events, the study also found that unborn babies respond more to strangers, than their own father. 

 

Dr Marx also highlighted the fact that previous research has been done on this interesting topic, and has shown that unborn babies also respond when their mother talks to them, helping them recognise her voice after birth.

 

Keep rubbing those bumps, mamas! 

92 Shares

Latest

Trending

Hello Mama!
Help us help you by allowing us and our partners to remember your device as having browsed MummyPages and serve you better content and ads

We're on a mission to help our mums and their families thrive by informing, connecting and entertaining.

Join us in our mission by consenting to the use of cookies and IP address recognition by us and our partners to serve you content (including ads) best suited to your interests, both here and around the web.

We promise never to share any other information that may be deemed personal unless you explicitly tell us it's ok.

If you want more info, see our privacy policy.