At six months pregnant with her first child, Yiota Kouzoukas is barely showing. The co-owner of Sabo Skirt’s baby bump is still quite small, and curious followers took to her Instagram comment section and DM’s with intrusive questions about her size.

 

The post that sparked all of the queries shows the fashion designer at 10 weeks, 16 weeks, and 22 weeks pregnant, with her baby belly showing a bit - but, apparently, not enough for some body-shamers.

 

The soon-to-be-mum had the perfect response.

 

In an Instagram post that shows her in a baseball cap and sporty underwear exposing her relatively small pregnant belly, Yiota explained to her 210k followers, “For the first four months of my pregnancy, my uterus was retroverted/tilted, which means that I was growing backwards into my body rather than outwards.”

 

 

*BUMP SIZE* I receive a lot of DMs and comments regarding the size of my bump, which is why I want to explain a few things about my body. Not that I’m upset/affected by these comments at all, but more for the reason of educating in the hope that some people are less judgemental on others and even themselves. For the first 4 months of my pregnancy, my uterus was retroverted/tilted which means that I was growing backwards into my body rather than outwards. Most people with this type of uterus tilt forward at around 12 weeks and continue growing outwards like you normally would. My uterus didn’t “flip forward” until well into being 4 months pregnant because of the backwards tilted position paired with decade old endometriosis scarring that I have on my uterosacral ligaments. Basically, these ligaments are acting like anchors keeping my uterus “inside” rather than “outside”, which is why I appeared smaller than most people for the first 4 or 5 months. Now, at #6monthspregnant I’m growing forwards just like everyone else while the scarring on my ligaments slowly breaks down. My torso is also short and my stomach is naturally toned which is keeping my belly super tight, so I’ve had to personally stop all ab exercises to avoid any issues with possible ab separation. This is for me personally, as instructed by my doctor and is in no way a blanket rule for anyone else. I’m perfectly healthy, baby is perfectly healthy and that’s all that matters. Our bodies and bumps are all different and our shapes and sizes are all different too 

A post shared by Yiota Kouzoukas (@yiota) on

 

About one in four women has a tilted uterus, also called a retroverted uterus, according to Dr Yvonne Butler Tobah from the Mayo Clinic. You can be diagnosed during a routine pelvic exam or through an internal ultrasound.

 

“Most people with this type of uterus tilt forward at around 12 weeks and continue growing outwards like you normally would,” Yiota continued in the October 9 post.

 

“My uterus didn’t ‘flip forward’ until well into being four months pregnant, because of the backwards tilted position paired with decade-old endometriosis scarring that I have on my uterosacral ligaments.”

 

“Basically, these ligaments are acting like anchors keeping my uterus ‘inside’ rather than ‘outside’, which is why I appeared smaller than most people for the first four or five months. Now, at #6monthspregnant, I’m growing forwards just like everyone else while the scarring on my ligaments slowly breaks down,” Yiota informed her followers.

 

Having a retroverted uterus does not contribute to infertility, as previously thought; but if the uterus is tilted at an extreme angle due to previous scarring (like Yiota’s from endometriosis), it can make conception more difficult. In those cases, Dr Butler Tobah recommends consulting a fertility specialist.

 

 

“I’m perfectly healthy, the baby is perfectly healthy, and that’s all that matters,” Yiota reassured her followers.

 

“Our bodies and bumps are all different, and our shapes and sizes are all different, too.”

 

Amen, sister!

 

Congratulations, Yiota, and thank you for educating more people on reproductive health!

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