You asked

How much sleep does my school-age child need?

When your child is fully rested he will be more settled, happy and ready for school the next day. Getting enough sleep will strengthen his immune system and can also help reduce the risk of infection and illness.There are lots of effective ways to deal with your child’s sleep difficulties.Children aged five to eight needs between ten and eleven hours sleep a night. They are usually tired after school and might be looking forward to bedtime from about 7:30pm. 
 
Bedtime routine
Sticking to a bedtime routine is very important at this age.  It will help your child wind down from his busy day. Keep the bedroom dark, cool and quiet so he can drift off to sleep easily.An example of a good bedtime routine might look like this:
 
 
Time
 
Routine
6.30pm
Put on pyjamas, brush teeth and go to the toilet.
7pm
Quiet time in the bedroom with a book and a bedtime story
7.15pm
Goodnight kiss and lights out.
 
After a big and exciting day at school, many of the day’s events and worries might still linger in your child’s head. If they’re unresolved when your child goes to bed, it can cause a restless night or bad dreams. You can help your child to settle and relax for sleep by promoting good sleep habits.
 

More questions

The best way to cure your child of bed-wetting is to involve him in the treatment plan.
Bed-wetting is not caused by a child being too lazy to get out of bed or as a bid to get attention. 
Bed-wetting is a problem that is quite common for many school age children.
The majority of kids need more sleep than their parents think. Signs that your child may not be getting enough rest include crankiness or lethargy by day, difficulty concentrating in school or failing grades, and being hard to wake up in the morning.
Getting enough sleep will strengthen your child's immune system and can also help reduce the risk of infection and illness.
Every parent will be all too familiar with late-night visits from their children: you’ve been tapped or poked awake and then your child utters those words, “Mummy, I can’t sleep.”

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